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Dr. McCullough wants to recognize the outpouring of international support and sympathy that has come into the network over the past week for his father’s death. In memory of the recent passing of Thomas L. McCullough, who was blessed with a full life and a peaceful death, we want to thank all of our wonderful listeners. Thomas L. McCullough, 1938-2022, father of Dr. Peter McCullough, is survived by his spouse Mary, and sons, Thomas and Matthew. Many of you got to know Thomas McCullough as one of the first COVID-19 patients in “Courage to Face COVID-19:Preventing Hospitalizations and Deaths while Battling the Biopharmaceutical Complex.”

In his memory on this show, we have a wonderful piece from fellow Irishman John O’Donohue shortly before his own death in 2008; the late Irish poet recited his poem “Beannacht,” which means blessing, during an interview with Krista Tippett.1

In this issue of the Report, Dr. Sherri Tenpenny does a deep dive into the history of the pediatric and adult vaccine schedules, how it all happened, and what the modern-day concerns are with the burgeoning list of vaccines and numbers of injections given over the course of young lives with the stated goal of improving health.2 Do they help individuals? Populations? Could there be any downside with such a large number of systemic antigenic exposures? We explore this topic in depth in the context of the COVID-19 debacle, where conventional physicians like Dr. McCullough are now re-examining the rationale, clinical evidence, and emerging concerns over safety when any vaccine is given indiscriminately without consideration of net clinical benefit. 

So let’s get real, let’s get loud; on America Out Loud Talk Radio, this is The McCullough Report!

The McCullough Report: Sat/Sun 2 PM ET Encore 7 PM – Internationally recognized Dr. Peter A. McCullough, known for his iconic views on the state of medical truth in America and around the globe, pierces through the thin veil of mainstream media stories that skirt the significant issues and provide no tractable basis for durable insight. Listen on iHeart Radio, our world-class media player, or our free apps on AppleAndroid, or AlexaEach episode goes to major podcast networks early in the week and can be heard on-demand anywhere in the world.

References:

1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfvS2LYbZLQ
2 https://drtenpenny.com/about/

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  • Dr. Peter McCullough

    Dr. McCullough is an internist, cardiologist, and epidemiologist managing the cardiovascular complications of both the viral infection and the injuries developing after the COVID-19 vaccine in Dallas, TX, USA. Since the outset of the pandemic, Dr. McCullough has been a leader in the medical response to the COVID-19 disaster and has published “Pathophysiological Basis and Rationale for Early Outpatient Treatment of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Infection,” the first synthesis of sequenced multidrug treatment of ambulatory patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the American Journal of Medicine and subsequently updated in Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine. He has dozens of peer-reviewed publications on the infection and has extensively commented on the medical response to the COVID-19 crisis in TheHill, America Out Loud, NewsMax, One America News, Victory Channel, NTD, and FOX NEWS Channel. Dr. McCullough has testified on pandemic response multiple times in the US Senate, Texas Senate Committee on Health and Human Services, Arizona Senate, Colorado General Assembly, New Hampshire Senate, Pennsylvania Senate, and South Carolina Senate. On December 7, 2022, Dr. McCullough co-moderated a Senate Panel and concluded that all COVID-19 vaccines should be removed from the market for excess mortality. Dr. McCullough has reviewed thousands of reports, participated in scientific congresses, group discussions, and press releases, and has been considered among the world's top experts on COVID-19.

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Kryptos
Kryptos
1 year ago

Condolences to Peter McCullough following the recent passing of his Father.

cylinda hair
cylinda hair
1 year ago

So sorry for your loss Dr. McCullough. God give you peace and comfort in the coming days ahead .

J V
J V
1 year ago

Dr. Sherri notes that the death rate due to measles in 1962 was 2 in 1 million. Less than 5 minutes of research finds many sources that confirm this is WILDLY inaccurate. It was more like 2.5 in 1,000. When your guests and you can’t do some basic research to find facts, how can you be trusted? As a member of the health community, we expect you to challenge your peers and rebuke false information.

See details below.

In 1963, the death rate due to measles in the United States was around 2.5 deaths per 1,000 cases. This means that approximately 0.25% of people who contracted measles in the U.S. died from the disease that year. However, it’s worth noting that measles was much more common in the U.S. in 1963 than it is today, with hundreds of thousands of reported cases each year. Thanks to widespread vaccination efforts, the number of measles cases has dropped dramatically in the U.S. and other developed countries, and the death rate is now much lower.

The information about the death rate due to measles in 1963 comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a national public health agency in the United States. The CDC collects and analyzes data related to infectious diseases, including measles, and has published historical data on measles morbidity and mortality in the U.S. on their website. The specific information regarding the death rate in 1963 can be found in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) from that year.

A paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in 1965 reported similar figures for measles mortality in the United States in the early 1960s. The paper, titled “Mortality Rates From Measles in the United States,” stated that in the years 1956-1960, the average death rate per 1,000 reported measles cases was 1.8, and in 1961-1962, it was 2.6.

Additionally, a review article published in the journal Vaccine in 2012 also reported similar figures for measles mortality in the U.S. in the 1960s. The article, titled “The impact of measles elimination on the prevalence of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome,” cited data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System and stated that from 1962 to 1965, the average death rate per 1,000 reported measles cases was 2.5.

These sources provide additional evidence that the death rate due to measles in the U.S. in 1963 was around 2.5 deaths per 1,000 cases.

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 1970 examined measles mortality in the United States from 1900 to 1966. The authors reported that in the early 1960s, the measles death rate was around 1.5 to 2.5 per 1,000 reported cases.

Another study published in the journal Pediatrics in 1972 examined measles mortality in the United States from 1959 to 1969. The authors reported that during this period, the average death rate per 1,000 reported cases of measles was 1.8, with a range of 0.3 to 3.4 depending on the year.

A review article published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases in 2004 also reported similar figures for measles mortality in the U.S. in the 1960s. The article cited data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System and stated that from 1962 to 1965, the average death rate per 1,000 reported measles cases was 2.5.

These peer-reviewed studies provide additional evidence that the death rate due to measles in the U.S. in 1963 was around 2.5 deaths per 1,000 cases.

Last edited 1 year ago by J V

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